Electro-Etching Introduction (print version)

Printworks is developing electro-etch techniques as an alternative to nitric acid for etching a range of metals (copper, brass, steel, zinc and aluminium). Electro-etching offers printmakers a very wide range of tones, textures and fine line etching using safer and more environmental friendly processes. Explore the application of both traditional and unconventional grounds and resists together with some exciting new hybrid platemaking techniques. Apply freehand line and tone, collagraphic textures and abstract/photo-collage images on a range of metal plates for deep intaglio etching. Understand the basic science, materials and equipment needed to enable successful electro-etching in the workshop or home studio.

DAY 1

Part 1 Practical Introduction

By the end of the first day you will take away two or three experimental etched metal plates that demonstrate some of the possibilities the technique offers.

Low-tech electro using salt water and other etching solutions
Use of batteries for small plates
Metals and etching action
Preparation: degreasing, basic resists & varnishes
Etching
Washing & cleaning off
Inking & printing
Plate care after printing
Cleaning up

Part 2: Tanks and Electro-Units

In part 2 we look in more detail at the theory and practical setup of typical electro-etch equipment. We also make some planned test plates to learn more about the way the etch process works with different resists and etch times.

Background: history, science and general guidelines
Electricity and water: basic safety
Tank Shapes: trays, vertical tanks
Electrical connectors, ‘bus-bars’ & insulator
Anodes and cathodes
Cathode: sheet or grille? (the ‘edge effect’)

Etched plate under the microscope
Test plates (resist, time, voltage and current)

Cleaning up

Part 3: Ground and Resists

In the third part we explore the variety of resists and grounds we can use with electro-etches to achieve an extensive range of texture and tone.

Traditional (Bitumen) Grounds
Acrylic Soft and Hard Ground
Acrylic Varnishes and Floor Waxes
Baldwins Ink Ground (BIG)
Stencils and Tapes
Varnishes, Enamels, Sharpies etc.
Other/Hybrid Resists

DAY 2

Part 4: Creative Tone, Stop-out, Multiple and Localised Bites

Traditional etching uses different processes to achieve fine even plate tones (Aquatint, Mezzotint, Spit-bite etc). We start by looking at these and at comparable ways to achieve controlled tone with electro- and other non-toxic etching. We see how to make the etch work more on certain areas of the plate and how to gauge etching time to intensify local tones or added textures.

Part 5: Working larger

In day 2 we will work on one or two plates (A5 size). We will employ some of the techniques and mark-making processes we have been developing on the first day and will learn how to use bigger tanks and a wider range of etching solutions.

By the end of Day 2 we should have prepared, eyched and proofed one or two complete intaglio prints and will see how the final proofs compare with the sorts of marks tones and textures we would normally produce using traditional chemical etching.

Going Further: other experimental electro-etch processes

These are some of the further areas for exploration that you may want to look atafter the two-day course. We will arrange some Open Access sessions where you will have the opportunity to ake these further.

Semi-dry etching
Open bite tone
Photopolymer and photo-emulsion resists
Using screen inks and screen emulsions as etching resists
Hybrid processes: screenprinting halftone resists onto plates
Sacrificial metal plates
Reverse etching (relief electroplating)

Here are a few inspirational images of Electro-Etching work from printmakers, craft makers and jewellers to give you an idea of what’s possible:

Electro-etching is not new! Some of these techniques have been used in mainstream printing since Victorian days. With the increasing interest in alternative and hybrid etch processes and a growing awareness of the health hazards associated with traditional acid etch, electro-etching has over the last ten to fifteen years become extremely popular and has attracted the attention of a new generation of artist-printmakers.

Many of these are not only very inexpensive and very low toxicity (unlike traditional bitumen based etching grounds) but also offer a very wide range of textures and tones. In this second session we see how to do safe and exciting etching both in the studio and at home without the need for dangerous acids or bitumen grounds.

Further Explorations…
If you would like to explore the amazing possibilities of electro-etching further then please get in touch right away. We are keen to go deeper into this very exciting subject by arranging some more advanced custom courses and by setting up a small workshop development group. Get in touch and let’s talk electro! or call/text John Wallett on 07757 305 327

View notes online: https://wivenhoeprint.works/electro-etching-introduction/

 

Electro-Etching Introduction

These notes and resource links are now online: https://wivenhoeprint.works/electro-etching-introduction/

Printworks is developing electro-etch techniques as an alternative to nitric acid for etching a range of metals (copper, brass, steel, zinc and aluminium). Electro-etching offers printmakers a very wide range of tones, textures and fine line etching using safer and more environmental friendly processes. Explore the application of both traditional and unconventional grounds and resists together with some exciting new hybrid platemaking techniques. Apply freehand line and tone, collagraphic textures and abstract/photo-collage images on a range of metal plates for deep intaglio etching. Understand the basic science, materials and equipment needed to enable successful electro-etching in the workshop or home studio.

This two-day course combines craft and experimental platemaking and printing. Personal experimentation is encouraged in classes and in the optional)workshop sessions. Extensive use of test plates is encouraged.

DAY 1

Part 1 Practical Introduction

By the end of the first day you will take away two or three experimental etched metal plates that demonstrate some of the possibilities the technique offers.

Low-tech electro using salt water and other etching solutions
Use of batteries for small plates
Metals and etching action
Preparation: degreasing, basic resists & varnishes
Etching
Washing & cleaning off
Inking & printing
Plate care after printing
Cleaning up

Part 2: Tanks and Electro-Units

In part 2 we look in more detail at the theory and practical setup of typical electro-etch equipment. We also make some planned test plates to learn more about the way the etch process works with different resists and etch times.

Background: history, science and general guidelines
Electricity and water: basic safety
Tank Shapes: trays, vertical tanks
Electrical connectors, ‘bus-bars’ & insulator
Anodes and cathodes
Cathode: sheet or grille? (the ‘edge effect’)

Etched plate under the microscope
Test plates (resist, time, voltage and current)

Cleaning up

Part 3: Ground and Resists

In the third part we explore the variety of resists and grounds we can use with electro-etches to achieve an extensive range of texture and tone.

Traditional (Bitumen) Grounds
Acrylic Soft and Hard Ground
Acrylic Varnishes and Floor Waxes
Baldwins Ink Ground (BIG)
Stencils and Tapes
Varnishes, Enamels, Sharpies etc.
Other/Hybrid Resists

DAY 2

Part 4: Creative Tone, Stop-out, Multiple and Localised Bites

Traditional etching uses different processes to achieve fine even plate tones (Aquatint, Mezzotint, Spit-bite etc). We start by looking at these and at comparable ways to achieve controlled tone with electro- and other non-toxic etching. We see how to make the etch work more on certain areas of the plate and how to gauge etching time to intensify local tones or added textures.

Part 5: Working larger

In day 2 we will work on one or two plates (A5 size). We will employ some of the techniques and mark-making processes we have been developing on the first day and will learn how to use bigger tanks and a wider range of etching solutions.

By the end of Day 2 we should have prepared, eyched and proofed one or two complete intaglio prints and will see how the final proofs compare with the sorts of marks tones and textures we would normally produce using traditional chemical etching.

Going Further: other experimental electro-etch processes

These are some of the further areas for exploration that you may want to look atafter the two-day course. We will arrange some Open Access sessions where you will have the opportunity to ake these further.

Semi-dry etching
Open bite tone
Photopolymer and photo-emulsion resists
Using screen inks and screen emulsions as etching resists
Hybrid processes: screenprinting halftone resists onto plates
Sacrificial metal plates
Reverse etching (relief electroplating)

Here are a few inspirational images of Electro-Etching work from printmakers, craft makers and jewellers to give you an idea of what’s possible:

Electro-etching is not new! Some of these techniques have been used in mainstream printing since Victorian days. With the increasing interest in alternative and hybrid etch processes and a growing awareness of the health hazards associated with traditional acid etch, electro-etching has over the last ten to fifteen years become extremely popular and has attracted the attention of a new generation of artist-printmakers.

Many of these are not only very inexpensive and very low toxicity (unlike traditional bitumen based etching grounds) but also offer a very wide range of textures and tones. In this second session we see how to do safe and exciting etching both in the studio and at home without the need for dangerous acids or bitumen grounds.

Further Explorations…
If you would like to explore the amazing possibilities of electro-etching further then please get in touch right away. We are keen to go deeper into this very exciting subject by arranging some more advanced custom courses and by setting up a small workshop development group. Get in touch and let’s talk electro! or call/text John Wallett on 07757 305 327

 

Brightlingsea Winterfest 2024: ‘Bloom Nourish & Flourish’

On Saturday February 17th we will be running two hands-on print sessions at the excellent Brightlingsea Winterfest where the theme is ‘Bloom Nourish & Flourish’. These taster sessions will be on acrylic plate ‘Drypoint’ etching combined with ‘Chine Colle’. The sessions will run from 10:30-12:30 and 1:30-3:30. (Sign up enquiries to Nicky Sheales nickysheales@gmail.com ) Sign up/book at The Mayor’s Community Day 10th Feb at the Community Centre 12-4 on the Wellbeing Day information table. https://brightlingseawinterfest.co.uk/events/mayors-community-day/

Shortly we will be adding more information about the processes of drypoint etching and Chine colle together with details of new drypoint taster sessions and short courses in this most accessible and creative printmaking process.

QR code for THIS page:

FOURTEEN ARTISTS

Prints and other pieces by Fourteen Artists from Wivenhoe Printworks

Old Grocery Gallery, 48 High Street Wivenhoe CO7 9AZ
Gallery opening hours: 10am – 5pm February 3rd to 6th
Open evening: Saturday 3rd Feb 6:30 – 9pm

 

POSTER JPG

THE ARTISTS

 

Oliver Bacon
Leslie Bell
Johanna Bennett
Miriam Clavane
Natalie Eldred
Amanda Jenkins
Eliza Kentridge
Nel Mooy
Carol Munn Giddings
Nancy Rose Taplin
Adrienne Tulley
Mathilde van der
Does de Willebois
Jayne Wallett
John Wallett

 

PUBLICITY


Downloadable JPG plus  printed A5 flyer and A3 poster:

Simple jpg version suitable for web and in emails


A5 FLYER (good for colour printing) (click to download)


A3 POSTER (good for colour printing) (click to download)


FOURTEEN ARTISTS QR code for publicity use. The QR code links to a publicly viewable event page on this website.)

Thanks…!
Carol MG and John W

carol.munngiddings@btinternet.com
johnwallettdesigner@gmail.com

Meet The Artist: Efi Savvides

Wivenhoe Printworks
July 29th  6 – 8:30pm

During the last few days of July and the first half of August Printworks was very pleased to welcome a temporary guest Member: the internationally recognised Cypriot artist Efi Savvides.

Efi was in the UK for just eighteen days as friend and guest of another Printworks member: Zoe Papadopoulous. During this very short time Efi worked with us at Printworks to develop a series of screen prints as part of an ongoing photo-print project on the historic imagery of Cypriot independence. The project included making halftone photo-stencil screenprints overprinted in multiple colours, based on contemporary images of the exile of the first leader of Cyprus Archbishop Makarios as he struggled for the country’s unification with Greece.

The images were printed often in seven or eight separate colours onto aluminium-faced ‘Dibond’ display boards. In the process there were a great deal of experimental colour tests and trials!

 

During our work together on this project we also began to learn more about the very wide range of Efi’s print and mixed media work. The opportunity was too good to miss, so at short notice we arranged the first of what will now be an occasional ongoing series of informal presentations. “Meet The Artist: Efi Savvides” (Saturday 29th July 6-8:30pm). This was an informal talk with slides illustrating her past and recent work, combining classical and modern imagery with personal mementos and focussing on political divisions of identity, notions of ‘home’ and the shared legacies of globalism. 

In the two hour evening session Efi introduced a selection of her internationally commissioned mixed-media works, and shared through an informal discussion session how her personal artistic experience had developed over recent years. 

Efi’s chosen media range across art heritage pieces screenprinted onto mass-produced paper napkins and handkerchiefs, large scale architectural prints viewed through translucent gauzes and window blinds, maps of lost homes, displaced districts printed onto gaudy cafe ‘hospitality’ trays, and photojournalist records of personal habitations lost and found.

Bridging conceptual art, figurative printmaking, architectural memory, photography and political commentary, Efi’s work is both delicate and beautiful in its execution and powerful in its questioning of historical identity, notions of home, and collective sense of belonging. 

The evening was a great success and simulated a great deal of lively questions and discussions.

If you have ideas for  future “Meet The Artist” events please contact Eliza Kentridge ( elizakentridge@hotmail.co.uk ) or John Wallett (  johnwallettdesigner@gmail.com ).

You can also check out Efi’s own website for more details of her exhibitions, commissions, collaborations and publications: https://efisavvides.com/About

 

 

Drypoint Intermediate

Here are some breezy shots from this weekend’s Intermediate Drypoint course. Two other people were unable to come but Dirk Paterson, Jo Kingsford and Jayne Wallett all seemed to have had a good time.

There seems to be a lot of interest for more sessions with a small focussed group of people who already have considerable drawing skills who want to apply these and use the great range of line tone andd texture that drypoint can offer.

Two half days (1-5pm) some quite sustained drawing and alot of very spirited inking with the very popular AKUA water-washable intaglio ink… plus of course our lovely big press!

Art Off The Rails: Call for artwork!

Matt Linley from the ‘Art Off The Rails’ scheme has asked Wivenhoe Printworks to put together images for display on Wivenhoe Station platforms for March and April. We are inviting all Printworks Members to submit images we can select and prepare for this great free display opportunity to promote Printworks and our individual creative work!

Artist and work details

Please give us details of your work and we will try to include these on the printed blowups. If you have a website or Instagram account then let us know and we will make some QR codes to stick by the work. Here is a little form to use to share this information with us:

 

More details about how the work will be seen:

Station Display Frames

Art Off The Rails have six large display frames on the station platforms: five on Platform 2 (Clacton line) and one on Platform 1 (London line). The frames are all 26’ x 40’ (66cm x 101.5cm) which is somewhere between A1 and A0 in size, and are weatherproof. The scheme also has a budget for printing up enlarged versions of scanned or photographed work and will take care of all installation.

Timing

Please bring in your images next week (Sunday 19th Feb at the latest) so we have time to scan them. The prepared image scans will be given to Matt on Wednesday 22nd Feb to send off to printers. The finished prints will be installed in the Station display frames by Matt on the weekend of March 4th/5th.

Images and Sizes

We need material that can be scanned or photographed, so it should be unframed and unglazed. If work is flat un-mounted and A4 or smaller we can scan it in the workshop (if flat but mounted we will photograph it). For work that is up to A3 and flat unmounted we can get it scanned professionally in Colchester as long as we have it by the morning of Friday 17th Feb. Bigger work up to A2 can also be scanned as long as it is flat and can cope with being wrapped round a drum scanner.

Sadly we can’t do anything with framed glazed work as this will not scan or photograph well.

Image style

We want a wide range of work but some kinds of image will be more suitable for this outdoor situation. As many people will view the framed work from the opposite platform large bold images will generally be most effective. If you have a print that has a powerful design but is small then we can scan it and enlarge it. But work that has a lot of fine detail may not work so well visually. If in doubt please contact John Wallett as soon as possible to avoid last minute probs.

Shallow Relief Objects

There are two smaller ‘Art On The Rails’ display areas above the toilet doors in the Ticket Office. These are approximately 55.8cm x 75.4cm. They can take work up to 4.5cm in depth behind their clear perspex fronts and have no side frames. Because they are high up they are not really suitable for flat printed work, but if you think you have something visually ‘punchy’ that is shallow 3D then please let us know?

ps About ‘Off The Rails’

First started in 2010, ‘Off the Rails’ was set up as an art and poetry project based at Wivenhoe Railway Station, showcasing local creative talent and businesses from Wivenhoe and North Essex. Wivenhoe attracts many visitors and residents because of its vibrant arts and literary scenes, and a large number of rail travellers use the station every week. With grant aid from several sources ‘Art Off the Rails’ has shown a range of very diverse art and graphic work over the years. The scheme is ongoing and welcomes new approaches from artists and makers. If you have an idea then take a look at their website and get in touch with them:
website: https://offtherailswivenhoe.uk/
fb: https://www.facebook.com/OfftheRailsWiv
email: offtherailswivenhoe@gmail.com